Verbundenheit

Connectedness, what is that supposed to be?

We are connected to the air we breathe, the water we drink, our environment as a whole. Connectedness is limitless.

The idea is to raise awareness of the topic of connection, to counter polarisation and polemics, the increasing hate messages, i.e. division in society. The Column with the profile portraits also stands as a symbol for each individual in society as something supportive. We are all – figuratively – pillars of society and democracy. The Column with the profile portraits also stands as a symbol for each individual in society as something supportive. We are all – figuratively speaking – pillars of society and democracy.

Under the motto “Join in and show profile!” citizens were actively involved in order to participate in the pillar by making their portrait available.

We humans are connected beings

Those who do not feel connected do not come into contact with themselves and their environment, become susceptible to negative thoughts and impulses and are less and less willing to get involved in something.

This is certainly what many people, especially people from other countries, of different origin and cultures, will feel. What do I (or we) have to do with this world, the foreigner or just the neighbour? This leads to demarkation, division, a feeling of separation and not belonging.

However, those who feel addressed, seen and connected become important to their environment, they perceive themselves and their counterpart positively.

They feel integrated, in relationship, in contact, just IN CONNECTION.

The idea of the Column of Connectedness

The Column shows a cross-section of our society. People from all social classes and age groups can be seen – 15 nations are represented here. There are no special preferences regarding the selection of profiles. No “heroes” or people who have particularly distinguished themselves will be preferred. They are people who e.g. are workers, craftsmen, politicians, children and teenagers. Here, diversity is shown, but not evaluated. All portraits are anonymous and thus symbolic “representatives” of the community.